Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Journey Mapping - Capturing Customer Expectations and Designing a Future State Customer Journey - Part 2

Before proceeding to a hypothetical illustration focusing on the development of a future state journey map using the Value Proposition tool, it’s useful to first have an approach for eliciting expectations from customers…that is, their jobs-to-be-done (JTBD).  Recall that JTBD represents those things the customer wants to accomplish in the course of a particular transaction or journey.  These include not only practical or functional accomplishments (e.g. to buy product X), but also the emotional and social expectations that often accompany most transactions.  

The JTBD method is typically used in a narrow sense to help guide the development of tangible products.  However, a key premise of CX is that the experience surrounding the shopping, purchase, and use of  a tangible item plays a critical role in the customer’s likelihood to repurchase and / or recommend.  Consequently, we’ll expand the Value Proposition tool to include those jobs that pertain to both the specific product or service, as well as the accompanying components that comprise the overall journey.  

What follows is a list of potential questions that can be used in customer interviews to assist the identification of the jobs associated with the journey.  In planning these interviews, it’s critically important that the customers selected represent the characteristics of the Persona that we want to better understand in the context of the journey.  So, for example, if our journey focuses on how die-hard fans go about buying tickets and attending their favorite team’s football game, then our interviewees must consist of this type of customer (and not include, for example, casual fans who have only a passing interest in football or the team).  As you’ll see, the following JTBD interview questions are general in nature, and may need to be modified somewhat to reflect a particular journey.  In essence though, the questions (1) should be applicable across a variety of industries, products and transactions.

Step 1 - Needs Awareness…
  • When did you first realize you needed to complete this particular job / transaction?
  • Where were you at the time?
  • What were you trying to do when this happened?

Step 2 - Emotions Awareness…An important but often not recognized component of a journey
  • Did you ask anyone else about their experience with this product / transaction?
    • In person?
    • Through social media / online review forums?
  • Describe this conversation…online / in person…what was the tone of the person(s) you were speaking with?
  • Before you purchased or completed the transaction, did you imagine what the experience would be like?  Describe the experience and your intended outcome.
  • Did you have any anxiety about the experience?  Did you hear something about the experience that made you nervous…what was it, and why did it make you nervous?

Step 3 - Building the Consideration Set
  • Tell me about how you went about looking for the product / service that would solve your problem
  • What kind of other solutions did you try?
    • IMPORTANT - ELICIT WHAT OPTIONS THE CUSTOMER WAS CONSIDERING, AND WHY THEY WERE DISMISSED

Step 4 - The Purchase / Journey
  • When did you purchase / undertake the transaction process?
  • Where were you when you started / finished?
  • What time of day was it?
  • Was anyone else with you?
  • How did you purchase or complete the transaction?
    • IMPORTANT - ESTABLISH THE MULTI-CHANNEL JOURNEY…DID THE CUSTOMER START OFF ONLINE AND COMPLETE IN STORE…WHAT DEVICES USED (PHONE, TABLET, KIOSK…)
    • ELICIT ANY PAIN POINTS WHEN SWITCHING FROM ONE CHANNEL TO ANOTHER
  • Did you buy anything else, or conduct another related or unrelated transaction at the same time?
  • Did you consider any other alternatives…product / service / provider?

Step 5 - Post Transaction / Journey
  • Did you accomplish your objective?
  • Did the product / service solve your problem?
  • How easy was it to complete the transaction?
    • What did you like about it?  What did you dislike?
      • Have you discussed the journey / product with anyone…
      • In person?
      • Posted online…where?
      • What did you say…did you recommend?
      • What thoughts do you have on improving the process?  What would you like to see different?

Over the next couple of posts, we’ll use these tools to develop a hypothetical use case for a future state journey map.


(1) Selected JTBD questions sourced from www.jasonevanish.com


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